Wilhemina Amelia Charlotte Poelnitz

F, b. circa 1772
     Wilhemina Amelia Charlotte Poelnitz was born circa 1772.1 She married Dr. Robertson Carloss.1

Child of Wilhemina Amelia Charlotte Poelnitz and Dr. Robertson Carloss

Citations

  1. [S137] Marie Townsend Butler, Townsends of Marlboro,.

Harriet Townsend

F, b. April 1839, d. 1910
     Harriet Townsend was born in April 1839 at Marlboro, South Carolina, United States.1 She was the daughter of Light Townsend and Mary Ann Carloss. Harriet Townsend married John B. K. Irby on 16 December 1860 at Marlboro, South Carolina, United States.2 Harriet Townsend died in 1910 at Marlboro, South Carolina, United States. She was buried at Mossy Bay Cemetery, Marlboro, South Carolina, United States.3

Children of Harriet Townsend and John B. K. Irby

Citations

  1. [S88] 1850 Census Marlboro SC, p. 158, Dw. 526, Fm. 526, Household of Light Townsend, 9 sep 1850.
  2. [S137] Marie Townsend Butler, Townsends of Marlboro,.
  3. [S714] Elizabeth Drake and Jacquelyn Rainwater, Marlboro SC Cemeteries,.

John B. K. Irby

M, b. circa 1830
     John B. K. Irby was born circa 1830 at South Carolina, United States.1 He married Harriet Townsend, daughter of Light Townsend and Mary Ann Carloss, on 16 December 1860 at Marlboro, South Carolina, United States.2

Children of John B. K. Irby and Harriet Townsend

Citations

  1. [S308] 1870 Census Marlboro SC, p. 445, Dw. 171, Fm. 171, Household of John B. Irby, Smithville Twp. 19 Aug 1870.
  2. [S137] Marie Townsend Butler, Townsends of Marlboro,.

Sarah "Sallie" Irby1

F, b. circa 1860
     Sarah "Sallie" Irby was born circa 1860 at Marlboro, South Carolina, United States.2 She was the daughter of John B. K. Irby and Harriet Townsend. Sarah "Sallie" Irby married D. Hilliard.1

Citations

  1. [S137] Marie Townsend Butler, Townsends of Marlboro,.
  2. [S308] 1870 Census Marlboro SC, p. 445, Dw. 171, Fm. 171, Household of John B. Irby, Smithville Twp. 19 Aug 1870.

James Irby1

M, b. circa 1865
     James Irby was born circa 1865 at Marlboro, South Carolina, United States.2 He was the son of John B. K. Irby and Harriet Townsend. James Irby married Bessie Tripett.1

Citations

  1. [S137] Marie Townsend Butler, Townsends of Marlboro,.
  2. [S308] 1870 Census Marlboro SC, p. 445, Dw. 171, Fm. 171, Household of John B. Irby, Smithville Twp. 19 Aug 1870.

Bessie Irby1

F, b. circa 1867
     Bessie Irby was born circa 1867 at Marlboro, South Carolina, United States.2 She was the daughter of John B. K. Irby and Harriet Townsend. Bessie Irby married James A. McArthur circa 1897 at Marlboro, South Carolina, United States.1,3

Children of Bessie Irby and James A. McArthur

Citations

  1. [S137] Marie Townsend Butler, Townsends of Marlboro,.
  2. [S308] 1870 Census Marlboro SC, p. 445, Dw. 171, Fm. 171, Household of John B. Irby, Smithville Twp. 19 Aug 1870.
  3. [S712] 1900 Census Marlboro SC, ED 99, Sh. 11, Dw. 204, Fm.204, Family of John B. Irby, Smithsville Twp., 14 Jun 1900.

John Irby1

M, b. circa 1871
     John Irby was born circa 1871 at Marlboro, South Carolina, United States.2 He was the son of John B. K. Irby and Harriet Townsend.

Citations

  1. [S137] Marie Townsend Butler, Townsends of Marlboro,.
  2. [S617] 1880 Census Marlboro SC, ED 111, p. 5-6, Dw.57, Fm. 57, Household of John B. Irby, Smithville Twp., 3 Jun 1880.

D. Hilliard1

M
     D. Hilliard married Sarah "Sallie" Irby, daughter of John B. K. Irby and Harriet Townsend.1

Citations

  1. [S137] Marie Townsend Butler, Townsends of Marlboro,.

James A. McArthur1

M, b. November 1864
     James A. McArthur was born in November 1864 at South Carolina, United States.2 He married Bessie Irby, daughter of John B. K. Irby and Harriet Townsend, circa 1897 at Marlboro, South Carolina, United States.1,2

Children of James A. McArthur and Bessie Irby

Citations

  1. [S137] Marie Townsend Butler, Townsends of Marlboro,.
  2. [S712] 1900 Census Marlboro SC, ED 99, Sh. 11, Dw. 204, Fm.204, Family of John B. Irby, Smithsville Twp., 14 Jun 1900.

Bessie Tripett1

F
     Bessie Tripett married James Irby, son of John B. K. Irby and Harriet Townsend.1

Citations

  1. [S137] Marie Townsend Butler, Townsends of Marlboro,.

John Townsend

M, b. circa 1740, d. before 1786
1772 Grant from King George III to John Townshend for 200 acres on northeast side of Big Reedy Creek in Craven County, South Carolina [SC Archives, Colonial Land Grants, Vol. 26, p. 326, Microfilm Series S213019]
     John Townsend was born circa 1740 at probably "Millfield" on Broadkill Creek, near Beaverdam Branch, Sussex, Delaware, United States. He was the son of Benedictus Townsend and Lucilla Light. John Townsend married Cortney (--?--). John Townsend died before 1786 at Marlboro, South Carolina, United States.
     Biography of John Townsend:
This biography of John Townsend (1740-1786) discusses all the records we have found that pertain to him and contain our rationale to support his being a son of Benedictus Townsend. Near the end of this biography we provide our evidence and rationale for concluding that all of the Townsends appearing in Marlboro County after 1790 are children of John Townsend.

North Carolina Records

We have been unable to find any Townsend marriages in North Carolina that pertain to this family. We were hopeful that there would have been at least one Townsend marriage record in the area of Granville and Orange County, North Carolina as we concluded Benedictus Townsend was likely living there between 1751 and 1764 and possibly later. Granville marriage records are extant for that time period but no Townsend’s are listed. Orange County marriage records prior to 1779 have not survived.

South Carolina Land Records

We were able to find deeds or plats on only four pieces of property that we can attribute to John Townsend (1740-1786). The earliest record we have found on John Townsend is a South Carolina plat dated 25 October 1771 wherein John Bremar, Esq. DSG conveyed by survey “unto John Townsend … 200 acres situate in Craven County the NE side of big ready Creek bounded to the N.W. … by the said Creek and Swamp and all other sides by vacant land … Surveyed on the 25th day of Oct 1771. (Recorded on 5 May 1772) Signed Anthony Pouncey"1 A royal grant for that land was issued on 20 July 1772 to John Townsend as follows: "George the third to John Townshend Two Hundred acres situate in Craven County on the North East side of the Big Reedy Creek, bounding the North West on said Creek and Swamp, on all other sides by vacant lands."2 This grant shows that this land is located on the northeastern side of Big Reedy Creek. This land located very near the border between Cheraw (now Marlboro County) Precinct and Georgetown (now Dillon County) Precinct. The fact that the land was vacant on all sides suggests that this property was remote from other landowners. The location of this land shows it to be some 5 miles east of where Light Townsend (1745-1817) owned 100 acres of land “on Hilson Bay on Head of Muddy Creek” (now Rogers Creek) that he had acquired from his father, Benedictus. The granting of 200 acres also suggests that John had at least three people (one hundred acres for John and fifty acres for two others) in his household.

A plat dated 3 February 1773 for 200 acres of land to David Leigh shows David Leigh's land bordering that of Light Townsend and John Townsend. The plat reads as follows: "South Carolina, Graven County … I have advanced and laid out unto David Leigh a plantation or tract of land containing two hundred acres situate … on the NE side of Pee Dee River, near Hilson Bay, bounded to the SoEt by John Townsend land & part by Light Townsends land and on all other sides by vacant land ...”3 Clearly this land is “near Hilson Bay” and its bordering Light Townsend land very likely implies that this land is located “on Hilson Bay on Head of Muddy Creek”. This David Leigh land is not bordering the land that John Townsend was granted “on the North East side of the Big Reedy Creek” in 1771. One can infer that by February 1773 John Townsend owned land lying “near Hilson Bay” and very probably “on the Head of Muddy Creek” very near where Benedictus Townsend was first granted land and next to where Light Townsend (1745-1817) owned land. This ownership of land by John Townsend (1740-1786) joining land owned by Light Townsend (1745-1817) suggests a very close relationship.

Thirteen days later, on 16 Feb 1773 another plat shows 150 acres of land was advanced to John Townsend (1740-1786) as follows: "I have advanced and Laid out unto John Townsend a planter a tract of land containing one hundred fifty acres Situate lying and being in Craven County on the NE side of Peedee River “.4 This is a most unusual land plat as the land appears to encompass and link together small pieces of vacant lands between previously established landowners. A Memorial dated August 1773 for that land was entered into the land Memorial books in Charleston as follows: "George the Third to John Townsend ... One hundred fifty acres Situate in Craven County on the North East side of Peedee River. North West on Land laid out for Mr. Cattle and Bounding West on Samuel Brown South part on Magee & part on Charles Kerbys North East on William Pounceys the other sides on Vacant Land.”5 It is not clear just where this land is located and we did not pursue plats or grants of the other individuals in an attempt to locate it. However, as a royal grant it does show that John Townsend's family had grown by at least three persons (fifty acres per person) that entitled him to the land. This suggests that by the end of 1772 John Townsend's family consisted of at least six persons including himself.

On 25 Nov 1775 John Townsend and his wife, Cortney, sold to John Brown for 20 Shillings 150 acres of land granted said Jno. Townsend in Craven Co "by His Excellency William Bull lying and being in Craven County aforesaid and butting and bounding as follows. That is to so say NW on land laid out for Mr. Cattle, W. on Samuel. S. part on Mr. Mcgee and part on Charles Kerbey's, NE on William Pouncy. The other sides on vacant land....The said plantation a tract of land containing one hundred and fifty acres of land." Signed: John (his mark) Townsend and Cortney (her mark) Townsend. Witness: Lite (his mark) Townsend, Samuel Brown, John (his mark) Kelly.6This is the same unusual shaped 150 acre tract of land granted to John Townsend on 31 August 1773, This deed was recorded into the Marlboro County Deed book in 1790, likely by someone recording earlier deeds on this property. This deed also shows for the first time that John's wife was named Cortney and that John and Cortney signed with their mark. The marks, if copied correctly by the recording clerk, are unique and might be of value in comparing this document with other documents signed by John and Cortney Townsend should they be found. The witnessing of this deed by Light Townsend again suggests a close relationship with John Townsend.

The above deeds and plats show that John Townsend (1740-1786) was already married and had at least 4 children by the end of 1772. There is no evidence to suggest exactly when he moved into South Carolina however, one can infer that it was probably between 1764, when Benedictus Townsend arrived and 1771 the date of his earliest record in South Carolina.

Petition of Safety

On 9 October 1775, Light Townsen and John Townsen signed a petition in St. David's Parish, Craven County to the Council of Safety of South Carolina for the issue of officer commissions for Robert Lide, Thomas Poe and William Watkins to head a company of Volunteers in opposition to the British.7 This clearly establishes John Townsend (1740-1786) as joining the Revolution and is one of the documents that caused the Daughters of the American Revolution to declare John Townsend as an American Patriot. There are no other records that show that John Townsend (1740-1786) served in any military capacity other than signing this 1775 petition.

Conclusion Regarding Parentage of John Townsend

We conclude based on the above deeds and petition of safety that John Townsend (1740-1786)and Light Townsend (1745-1817) are brothers. We have also concluded that Light Townsend is a son of Benedictus Townsend thereby making John Townsend (1740-1786) also the son of Benedictus.

Conclusions Regarding the Death of John Townsend

On 4 Sept 1786 in Marlboro County, "Geo. Trawick appeared in Open Court and acknowledged a deed of conveyance for 150 acres of land to Wm Townshend, son of John Townshend and ordered the same to be recorded.” "And at the same time one other tract of 100 acres to Benj Townshend and ordered to be recorded.”8

The first of these two deeds9 dated 4 September 1786 is as follows: George Trayweak, planter of Marlborough to William Townsend, son of John Townsend for the sum of 5 pounds sterling that parcel of “land containing One hundred & fifty acres more or less situate lying and being whereon Cortney Townsend now lives and hath such marks courses and scope as is agreed by the said parties … being part of a tract of land containing six hundred & forty acres granted to the said Geo Trayweak on the fifth day of June in the year 1786 by William Moutrie Governor & Commander in Chief in and over the State of South Carolina.” Signed. George Traweak, Witnesses: Wm Whitfield, John Hilson, Jessie John. This is a most unusual and revealing deed that implies several things. They are:

First: The words "whereon Cortney Townsend now lives" implies that John Townsend had died as why else would the deed mention his wife, Cortney, instead of mentioning him. If John Townsend were still alive, he would likely have been the purchaser of this land, where his wife “now lives”, rather than his son as women had no right of ownership, except through a husband. Therefore, based on this deed and as there is no further indication of a John Townsend born about 1740 in any further records in the area we are placing John Townsend (1740-1786) as having died in Craven County before 1786.

Second: These 150 acres were part of a 640 acre grant (1square mile) of land made to George Trayweak by the Governor of the newly formed state of South Carolina after the Revolutionary War. It appears that Cortney Townsend (and likely her children) were living on that same land that was granted to George Trayweak in June 1786. This suggests that Cortney Townsend and family may have been renting the land they were living on and were now buying it. As will be shown later in the Trawek to Gin deed this tract of land is “on E Side of the three Creeks” and very likely is near the Mossy Bay Cemetery where some of these Townsends are buried.

Third: This 1786 deed suggests that William is one of the oldest male children of the family. His mother, Cortney Townsend, being female, had no right to buy land in her name thereby leaving the buying and ownership of the land “whereon Cortney Townsend now lives” to an older son.

Fourth: This deed states that William Townsend is the son of John Townsend probably to distinguish him from his Uncle, William Townsend (1746-), who likely is still living in the area.

The second of these two deeds dated 4 September 1786 is as follows: George Trayweak, planter of Marlborough to Benjamin Townsend for the sum of 5 pounds sterling that “parcel of land containing One hundred acres more or less situate lying and being adjoining Lyght Townsend’s land whereon he now lives and hath such marks course and Shapes as is agreed on by the said parties … being part of a tract of land containing six hundred & forty acres granted to the said Geo Trayweak on the fifth day of June in the year 1786 by William Moutrie Governor & Commander in Chief in and over the State of South Carolina.” Signed. George Traweak, Witnesses: Wm Whitfield, John Hilson, Jessie John. 10 These two deeds being executed at the same time suggests Benjamin is also a son of John Townsend (1740-1786), just as the first deed is to William Townsend, son of John Townsend (1740-1786). Tula Townsend Wyatt, on p. xviii of her book Seven Townsend Brothers indicates she deduced based on these deeds that William and Benjamin were both sons of John and Cortney Townsend. 11 That is our conclusion also.

The following is an abstract of a Marlboro County deed dated 3 March 1787 stating: "Georg. Trawek of Cheraws District Malburg County to Mashack Gin of same. For 60 (?) pounds Sterling, 50 acres more or less on E Side of the three Creeks, joining Jacob Green, William Townsend, Robert Blear... being part of a tract of 640 acres granted to sd George Trawek 5 June 1785... George Trawek, Wit: Light (his mark) Townsend, John (his mark) Townsend, Benjamin (his mark) Townsend. Rec 5 Mar 1787”12 From this deed we deduce that the Light Townsend (who signed with his mark) is Light Townsend (1745-1817) and not Light Townsend (1770-1851) who would not have been of age to sign such a deed and who signed later deeds with his signature. Light Townsend (1745-1817) is also known to have adjoining land as indicated in the 4 Sep 1786 deed between George Trayweak and Benjamin Townsend mentioned above. We also deduce that the John Townsend who witnessed this deed is John Townsend (1760-1843) and not John Townsend (1740-1786). Our rationale for this is we believe that John Townsend (1740-1786) was dead by this time and the unique mark used by John Townsend (1740-1786) on an earlier deed was not recorded on this deed. Benjamin as concluded above is the son of John Townsend (1740-1786)

Conclusions Regarding the Children of John Townsend and His Wife, Cortney

The above allows us to conclude that William and Benjamin Townsend are the sons of John Townsend (1740-1786) and his wife, Cortney. However, we have found evidence indicating eight Townsend’s born in the 1760 to 1770 time period, were residing in Marlboro County after 1790. Those Townsend’s are John (1760), William (1762), James (1763). Rhoda (1765), Mary (1765), Benjamin (1765), Thomas (1765), and Light (1770). We have concluded that these Townsend’s are all children of John Townsend (1740-1786) and his wife, Cortney. Our evidence and rationale for coming to this conclusion is as follows:

First: After extensive searching, we have found records to show the existence of only three Townsend males in Cheraw Precinct that could be the father of these Townsends born in the 1760-1770 time period. Those males are John Townsend (1740-1843), Light Townsend (1745-1817) and William Townsend (1746- ).

Second: Two of these males, Light and William, came to Craven County with Benedictus Townsend about 1764. This is based on William and Light Townsend paying the quit rents and obtaining deeds in their name of the same land granted Benedictus Townsend in 1764/65. [See biography of Benedictus Townsend]

Third: Light Townsend (1745-1817) removed from South Carolina to Kentucky in 1788. [See biography of Light Townsend (1745-1817)] His 1817 Will suggests he took his whole family with him. In his Will, Light clearly named his children and grandchildren. The only children mentioned are children that went with him to Kentucky or were born in Kentucky after he arrived there. None of the Townsends found in Marlboro County after 1790 (except for Mary) are named in that will. There is no mention in the Will of any children that may have remained in South Carolina after he moved to Kentucky. (The Mary in the Will is clearly Mary (Polly) Townsend who married David Sample and should not be confused with the Mary Townsend of Marlboro who married a Stapleton.) We realize that it is possible that Light just did not name any children that he left behind in South Carolina in his Will, but do not believe he did so. His estate consisted of land and household goods, which he left to his wife and six unmarried children. He specifically left a token one-dollar to his daughter Polly (Mary) who was married with 10 children at the time of the will, and one dollar to each of his three grandchildren by his deceased son, Coleson. Probably this was to prevent Polly or Coleson's children from making claim against the estate for a fuller share. The 1817 will of Light Townsend (1745-1817) appears to be have been well considered, and well drawn. It does not appear to have been a deathbed Will that was quickly drawn and merely left everything to his wife and unnamed children as such wills are wont to do. It seems reasonable to believe that Light Townsend (1745-1817) would have and could have easily included the names of any other children of his (such as those he may have left in South Carolina) and left them a token amount to insure that they would not be able to make a claim against the estate based on being left out of the Will. Since he did not name any other children in his will one can only conclude that there were no other living children except those mentioned in the will. We conclude that Light Townsend (1745-1817) is not the father of any of the Townsend’s that appear in Marlboro County South Carolina after 1790.

Fourth: We know that William Townsend (1746- ) acquired his father's 50-acre plat about 1767. Such a small plat suggests that William was single at the time. There is no record of his acquiring additional land beyond the 50 acres and we cannot find any further records that would suggest he had either married or had children. The lack of any further records leaves us to conclude that none of the Townsend's appearing in Marlboro County after 1790 are the children of William.

Fifth: The third Townsend to come into Craven County was John Townsend (1740-1786) who was granted 200 acres of land in 1772 and granted another 150 acres in 1773. It is clear that John Townsend had at least six persons in his household (including him) to receive these grants. Since there are no records of slaves being in these Townsend families until the 1830's these six persons no doubt are John, his wife, Cortney and four children. We have identified eight Townsends who appear to have been born before 1773 and appear in Marlboro County records around 1800. They are John (1760), William (1762), James (1763), Rhoda (1765), Mary (1765), Benjamin (1765), Thomas (1765), and Light (1770). As discussed above we have concluded that William and Benjamin are sons of John Townsend. That leaves John, James, Rhoda, Mary, Thomas and Light that we have been unable to find clear evidence to indicate whom their parents were. We have found no evidence of William Townsend (1746- ) having any children and have concluded that they are not the children of Light Townsend (1745-1817). We can only conclude that all of these children are the children of John Townsend (1740-1786) and his wife, Cortney. Obviously, this is not a strong or perhaps even a convincing argument by which to conclude these Townsends are the children of John Townsend. However, without finding any additional evidence after a long and reasonably thorough search for pertinent records, this is the best conclusion we can draw. We do provide, in some cases, additional evidence to support this conclusion in the biographies of these children. Hopefully, further evidence will surface in future to help clarify this matter.

Rebuttal of Conflicting Information

The above is our rationale for our conclusion that all Townsend’s appearing after 1790 in Marlboro County, South Carolina are the children of John Townsend (1740-1786) and not Light Townsend (1745-1817) or William Townsend (1746- ). We realize that dozens of Townsend researchers have previously stated that all these children were the children of Light Townsend and not John Townsend. We have thoroughly researched the basis on which these researchers based their work and believe that their conclusion that Light Townsend (1745-1817) is the father of these children derives from three sources which we find to be non-credible.

The first source is in J. A. W. Thomas’s History of Marlboro County published in 1897 wherein on page 43 he states in referring to the Townsend family: “The first to come, so far as our information goes, was Light, who is put down as an active soldier of the Revolution. He is said to have been the father of two children, John and Rhoda, both of whom the writer distinctly recollects..."13 J. A. W. Thomas uses the statement “He is said” when referring to Light Townsend being the father of John and Rhoda. This suggests that J. A. W. Thomas is not sure of that relationship and so states that uncertainty. Considering that this statement was made 110 years after Light Townsend was in Marlboro County, it should not be taken as a statement that J. A. W. Thomas had any personal knowledge of. There is little doubt that he knew John and Rhoda, but it is very doubtful that he knew who their father was. J. A. W. Thomas's statement that Light Townsend is their father has little credibility and should not be considered as factual.

The second source is Tula Townsend Wyatt in her book Seven Townsend Brothers. On the first page of her Preface and Acknowledgement she states: “My father and grandpa had copied family records from my great grandfather, Thomas R. Townsend’s Bible which was published in 1820, and given to him by his parents, Thomas Townsend (1765-1828) and Elizabeth Stapleton Townsend. The sheets of “fools cap” paper held many names and dated (sic) but had been handled so much that they were in scraps. With my mother’s careful fingers, the dusty scraps of old paper were arranged so as to be deciphered and copied by my grandfather and my father nearly a century ago. These old scraps have turned to dust, but the records written on them a century and a half ago are preserved for generations to come.”14 She goes on to state “It took many years, much correspondence, and research to get the genealogy proven as had been written in the old Bible and on “fools cap” paper in the beginning.” On pages xxi and xxii she further talks about the “fools cap” paper, which was “a mass of crumpled paper” which Ms. Wyatt and her father “did to the best of our ability, copy that which was left of the old records; and after years of searching and collaborating with interested Townsend kindred, we found these old records to be true.” These statements clearly indicate that the Seven Townsend Brothers was not based on the “fools cap” paper records or on any Bible records. Those records were apparently used by Ms. Wyatt only to “collaborate” what she had found through her own searching and clearly were not the basis for her genealogy. Ms. Wyatt states in very clear terms on page xiv “Light Townsend of Marlboro and his wife were the parents of a least six children:” She then lists John (1760), Rhoda, Thomas (1765), Light (1770), William and Mary as their children. This compiler was not able to determine the basis on which Ms. Wyatt made that statement. The omission of any proof or basis for that statement is very uncharacteristic of Ms. Wyatt. One merely has to read her work and read how she generally supports her statements with clear rationale and often with copies of deeds, indentures, articles, or clear citations of sources to prove her statement. On later pages she does discuss and even quotes J. A. W. Thomas statement that Light Townsend “is said” to be the father of John and Rhoda, but then she goes on to suggest that Light had other children that J. A. W. Thomas would not remember, such as Ms. Wyatt’s ancestor Thomas Townsend (1765-1828). The way her statement reads it appears that she believed the J. A. W. Thomas statement to be credible, which as discussed above we found to be non-credible. We also suspect that Ms. Wyatt incorrectly believed that the deeds and the Moses Pearson Will witnessed by Light Townsend around 1800 were deeds signed by Light Townsend (1745-1817). As discussed in the biography of Light Townsend (1745-1817) we found the deeds and Will were signed by Light Townsend (1770-1851). These deeds were signed with a signature (as Light Townsend (1770-1851) was wont to do) and not with a "his mark" as Light Townsend (1745-1817) signed his papers. Also Ms. Wyatt did not know that Light had moved to Kentucky and it would be very unlikely that he would have been in Marlboro to sign all those papers.

The third source is the ”Townsend Papers” in the possession of the John Rogers Townsend family of Marlboro. Marie Townsend Butler recently abstracted15 these papers. These Townsend Papers contain original deeds and grants to Benedictus and Light Townsend from the 1700’s that were handed down owner to owner finally ending up as the property of John Rogers Townsend. A cursory examination of these papers could suggest that the 100 acre property granted Benedictus Townsend by King George III in 1765, and who had in turn sold to his son, Light Townsend (1745-1817) had passed down through the family, father to son, by inheritance. That being the reason those deeds were in the possession of John Rogers Townsend and suggesting that John Rogers Townsend and his grandfather, Light Townsend (1798-1870) were direct descendants of Benedictus and Light Townsend (1745-1817). What better reason was there for those original deeds to be in the possession of the John Rogers Townsend family of Marlboro? Marie Butler told this compiler that it took her many hours to abstract those papers, as they were very faint and difficult to read. However, a close examination of those abstracts when lined up in chronological order shows that the 100 acre property Light Townsend (1745-1817) acquired from his father, Benedictus Townsend was sold by Light Townsend to William Allston in 1780. Then in 1823, this same 100 acre property was purchased from Charlotte Allston, widow of William Allston, by Jabish Townsend (son of Rhoda Townsend) . Light Townsend (1798-1870), grandfather of John Rogers Townsend then acquired this land from the estate of Jabish Townsend in 1847 via a Sheriff’s sale after Jabish had died. Those transactions clearly explain how the Benedictus and Light Townsend grant and deed for the 100 acres of property ended up in the possession of Light Townsend (1798-1870) and subsequently the John Rogers Townsend family of Marlboro. (In those days they often did not record deeds, but rather passed the deeds with all prior transfer deeds down from property owner to property owner.) Due to the fact that the chain of transfer for this property from Benedictus Townsend down to Light Townsend (1798-1870) was not from father to son, but was interrupted by a 43 year ownership by the Allstons, the possession of these early deeds by John Rogers Townsend does not demonstrate direct decent from Benedictus and Light Townsend (1745-1817). Certainly, John Rogers Townsend may have thought he was descended from Light Townsend (1745-1817) as that is what Marie Townsend Butler indicated in her 1980 genealogy The Townsends of Marlboro that she compiled from her fathers papers. Ms. Butler in a letter dated 26 June 2005 to this compiler stated: “However, I do feel some hesitancy about the “Townsends of Marlboro”. I am not at all positive of the accuracy. As you know, this was put together only to try to save information gathered by my father John Rogers Townsend. Quite frankly, some of it was hard to read – letters from many different places.”

We know, as we have a copy of a 1957 letter Tula Townsend Wyatt wrote to John Rogers Townsend, that Ms. Wyatt corresponded with (and may have even visited) John Rogers Townsend of Marlboro in the 1950’s or 60’s. She no doubt was aware of and may have even examined the “Townsend Papers” that John Rogers Townsend had. One could speculate that Ms. Wyatt and John Rogers Townsend influenced each other into thinking they had found two independent credible sources (The Townsend Papers and the “fools cap” papers”) both inferring that Light Townsend (1745-1817) was the father of these children. It would not be unreasonable, faced with these two sources and the J. A. W. Thomas statement, that they would have been very confident to believe that Light Townsend (1745-1817) was the father of all these children. In fact, it may very well have appeared to them to be a truth so apparent that there was little need to provide further explanation. This may explain why Mrs. Wyatt provided no explanation for her statement that Light was father of these children.

As we compiled other documents of these early Marlboro Townsends and were able to trace Light Townsend from South Carolina to Kentucky, (in part using information from Kentucky gathered by Howard Bowers) it became more and more apparent that Light Townsend could not be the father of these children as claimed by Ms. Wyatt and others.

The children listed below are based on the above rationale.

Children of John Townsend and Cortney (--?--)

Citations

  1. [S798] "SC Colonial Land Plats". Vol. 20, p. 384, Film Series S213184.
  2. [S797] "SC Colonial Land Grants". Vol. 26, p. 326, Film Series 5213019.
  3. [S798] "SC Colonial Land Plats". Vol. 16, p. 320, item #2.
  4. [S798] "SC Colonial Land Plats". Vol. 20, p. 385, item #1, film S213189.
  5. [S348] "SC Colonial Land Memorials". Book 13, p. 352, Item #1.
  6. [S799] "Marlboro SC Deeds". DB AA p. 45.
  7. [S783] South Carolina Historical Society, SC Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Vol II, Oct. 1901, No. 4, pp. 264-265.
  8. [S153] Brent H. Holcomb, Marlborough Co. SC Court Records, p. 5.
  9. [S799] "Marlboro SC Deeds". Deed Book A-1, p. 41.
  10. [S799] "Marlboro SC Deeds". Deed Book A-1, p. 42.
  11. [S135] Tula Townsend Wyatt, Seven Townsend Brothers of Texas, p. xviii.
  12. [S823] Gwen DeBerry Hendrix, Hendrix, Marlbourough SC Abstracts Books A-1&AA, item #63, p. 10.
  13. [S826] Rev. J. A. W. Thomas, History of Marlboro County, p. 43.
  14. [S135] Tula Townsend Wyatt, Seven Townsend Brothers of Texas, p. i.
  15. [S793] Marie Townsend Butler, "Townsend Papers."

Minor Anderson

M, b. circa 1820, d. before 1870
     Minor Anderson was born circa 1820 at Virginia, United States.1 He married Kisiah Hopper, daughter of John Hopper and Susan (--?--).1 Minor Anderson died before 1870 at Henderson, Rusk, Texas, United States.2
     Biography of Minor Anderson:
The earliest record we have found on Minor Anderson is his enumeration as Head of Household in the 1840 Census of Franklin County, Tennessee. That listing shows one male under 5 (John), one male age 20-30 (Minor) and one female age 20-30, (Kisiah).

The next record we have found is the 1850 Census of Franklin County, Tennessee where in the names of all members of the household are enumerated for the first time. That census shows Kisiah and the names of their 5 children, John, Sarah, Susan, Nancy, and Mary Ann.

In 1850 the Minor Anderson family is living next door to the John Hopper family. They were also living next door to the John Hopper family in 1840. This living next door and the observation that the first male child of Minor Anderson is named John, the first female child is Sarah and the second female child is named Susan strongly suggests that Kisiah is the daughter of John Hopper and his wife, Susan. John and Susan Anderson are very likely named for their material grandparents and Sarah is likely named for Kisiah's sister, Sarah Hopper. This is the basis upon which we are showing the parents of Kisiah to be John Hopper and his wife, Susan.

The Minor Anderson family is next found in the 1860 Census of the Town of Henderson in Rusk County, Texas. However, James, Victory and Rufus have been added to the family and daughter Sarah is not in this household suggesting she married or died. This census shows that Victory and Rufus were born in Texas with the other children born in Tennessee. Thus showing hat the Minor Anderson family removed from Franklin County, Tennessee to Rusk County, Texas about 1853.

The 1870 census shows Kisiah Anderson and 6 of her children still living in Henderson, Rusk County, Texas. Minor, John and Sarah are not in this household. This suggest that Minor died before 1870.

The 1880 census of Henderson, Rusk County Texas shows Elijah J. Anderson and his family. Elijah J. is clearly the same person as James Anderson in the 1860 and 1870 census records. Living with Elijah James Anderson is his brother, Rufus, age 22 and mother, Kisiah age 62.

Children of Minor Anderson and Kisiah Hopper

Citations

  1. [S608] 1850 Census Franklin TN, p. 71, Dw. 949, Fm. 949, Household of Minor Anderson, Dist. 9, 16 Oct 1850.
  2. [S606] 1870 Census Rusk TX, p. 488B, Dw. 353, Fm. 360, Household of Caesare (Kisiah) Anderson, Henderson, 21 Sep 1870.

Kisiah Hopper

F, b. circa 1822
     Kisiah Hopper was born circa 1822 at Kentucky, United States.1 She was the daughter of John Hopper and Susan (--?--). Kisiah Hopper married Minor Anderson.2

Children of Kisiah Hopper and Minor Anderson

Citations

  1. [S607] 1860 Census Rusk TX, p. 198B, Dw.87, Fm. 93, Household of Minor Anderson, Henderson, 11 June 1860.
  2. [S608] 1850 Census Franklin TN, p. 71, Dw. 949, Fm. 949, Household of Minor Anderson, Dist. 9, 16 Oct 1850.

John G. Anderson

M, b. circa 1838
     John G. Anderson was born circa 1838 at Franklin, Tennessee, United States.1 He was the son of Minor Anderson and Kisiah Hopper.

Citations

  1. [S608] 1850 Census Franklin TN, p. 71, Dw. 949, Fm. 949, Household of Minor Anderson, Dist. 9, 16 Oct 1850.

Sarah F. Anderson

F, b. circa 1842
     Sarah F. Anderson was born circa 1842 at Franklin, Tennessee, United States.1 She was the daughter of Minor Anderson and Kisiah Hopper.

Citations

  1. [S608] 1850 Census Franklin TN, p. 71, Dw. 949, Fm. 949, Household of Minor Anderson, Dist. 9, 16 Oct 1850.

Susan E. Anderson

F, b. circa 1844
     Susan E. Anderson was born circa 1844 at Franklin, Tennessee, United States.1 She was the daughter of Minor Anderson and Kisiah Hopper.

Citations

  1. [S608] 1850 Census Franklin TN, p. 71, Dw. 949, Fm. 949, Household of Minor Anderson, Dist. 9, 16 Oct 1850.

Nancy Anderson

F, b. circa 1846
     Nancy Anderson was born circa 1846 at Franklin, Tennessee, United States.1 She was the daughter of Minor Anderson and Kisiah Hopper.

Citations

  1. [S608] 1850 Census Franklin TN, p. 71, Dw. 949, Fm. 949, Household of Minor Anderson, Dist. 9, 16 Oct 1850.

Mary Ann Anderson

F, b. circa 1848
     Mary Ann Anderson was born circa 1848 at Franklin, Tennessee, United States.1 She was the daughter of Minor Anderson and Kisiah Hopper.

Citations

  1. [S608] 1850 Census Franklin TN, p. 71, Dw. 949, Fm. 949, Household of Minor Anderson, Dist. 9, 16 Oct 1850.

Elijah James Anderson

M, b. circa 1852
     Elijah James Anderson was born circa 1852 at Franklin, Tennessee, United States.1 He was the son of Minor Anderson and Kisiah Hopper. Elijah James Anderson married Balin (--?--).2

Child of Elijah James Anderson and Balin (--?--)

Citations

  1. [S607] 1860 Census Rusk TX, p. 198B, Dw.87, Fm. 93, Household of Minor Anderson, Henderson, 11 June 1860.
  2. [S605] 1880 Census Rusk TX, ED 73, p. 23D, Dw. 100, Fm. 115, Household of Elijah J. Anderson, Town of Henderson, 12 June 1880.

S. A. Victory Anderson

F, b. circa 1854
     S. A. Victory Anderson was born circa 1854 at Henderson, Rusk, Texas, United States.1 She was the daughter of Minor Anderson and Kisiah Hopper.

Citations

  1. [S607] 1860 Census Rusk TX, p. 198B, Dw.87, Fm. 93, Household of Minor Anderson, Henderson, 11 June 1860.

Rufus Anderson

M, b. circa 1858
     Rufus Anderson was born circa 1858 at Henderson, Rusk, Texas, United States.1 He married Maria Melvina Waybourn on 15 February 1876 at Montague, Texas, United States.
     Biography of Rufus Anderson:
The earliest record we have found on Rufus Anderson is his enumeration as Head of Household in the 1880 census of Montague County, Texas. In that census he is listed as R. Anderson, age 26, born Illinois, living with his wife, M. M. age 19 born Texas and son, A. Anderson, age 1 born Texas. The LDS Church had records showing that a Mariah Melvina Waybourn had married Rufus Anderson in Montague County, Texas on 15 February 1876. The source of that information was not stated. That information also showed that Mariah Melvina Waybourn was the daughter of William Robert Waybourn and Mary Ann Gage and that Melvina died on 4 August 1899. These dates seem to be accurate and supported by information discussed below and are included in this work but they should be verified.

Rufus Anderson, widower, and four of his children, Austin, Nellie, Rona and Jesse are next found in the 1900 Census of the Cherokee Nation, Indian Territory at Township 21N . (This areas is very likely the location of present day Mayes County, Oklahoma which was formed in 1903 from Indian Territory). This census shows that Rufus's wife likely died between 1898, the birth of son, Jesse and 1900 the time of the census. Based on the birth places of the children this shows that Rufus removed from Montague County Texas to Indian Territory between 1880 and 1884.

Rufus is next found in the 1910 Census of Mayes County, Oklahoma with his son, Jesse age 12. His son, Austin has married and has his family nearby. Rufus is found in the 1920 and 1930 census of Mayes County, Oklahoma, widower, living with his son, Austin and his family.

We found a Rufus Anderson listed in the Civil War Pension Index (1861-1934) that was very difficult to read but shows that Rufus Anderson of Oklahoma. was awarded a pension (Application 181__, Certificate 11321) possibly in 1917 for military service on the Texas Frontier in 1875-1876.

Children of Rufus Anderson and Maria Melvina Waybourn

Citations

  1. [S607] 1860 Census Rusk TX, p. 198B, Dw.87, Fm. 93, Household of Minor Anderson, Henderson, 11 June 1860.

John Hopper

M, b. circa 1789
     John Hopper was born circa 1789 at Virginia, United States.1 He married Susan (--?--) circa 1810.1

Child of John Hopper and Susan (--?--)

Citations

  1. [S608] 1850 Census Franklin TN, p. 71, Dw. 948, Fm. 948, Household of John Hopper, Dist. 9, 16 Oct 1850.

Susan (--?--)

F, b. circa 1793
     Susan (--?--) was born circa 1793 at Tennessee, United States.1 She married John Hopper circa 1810.1

Child of Susan (--?--) and John Hopper

Citations

  1. [S608] 1850 Census Franklin TN, p. 71, Dw. 948, Fm. 948, Household of John Hopper, Dist. 9, 16 Oct 1850.

Balin (--?--)

F, b. circa 1855
     Balin (--?--) was born circa 1855 at Alabama, United States.1 She married Elijah James Anderson, son of Minor Anderson and Kisiah Hopper.1

Child of Balin (--?--) and Elijah James Anderson

Citations

  1. [S605] 1880 Census Rusk TX, ED 73, p. 23D, Dw. 100, Fm. 115, Household of Elijah J. Anderson, Town of Henderson, 12 June 1880.

Effie E. Anderson

F, b. circa 1878
     Effie E. Anderson was born circa 1878 at Henderson, Rusk, Tennessee, United States.1 She was the daughter of Elijah James Anderson and Balin (--?--).

Citations

  1. [S605] 1880 Census Rusk TX, ED 73, p. 23D, Dw. 100, Fm. 115, Household of Elijah J. Anderson, Town of Henderson, 12 June 1880.