Clarence E. Brannan

M, b. 24 November 1892, d. 4 November 1937
     Clarence was born on 24 November 1892 at Suwannee, Florida, United States.1 He was the son of George W. Brannan and Ella Walker. Clarence died on 4 November 1937 at Suwannee, Florida, United States, at age 44. His body was buried in November 1937 at Friendship Cemetery, Suwannee, Florida, United States.2

Citations

  1. [S23] 1900 Census Suwannee FL, E.D. 112, Sheet 2, Line 33.
  2. [S225] Suwannee County Genealogical Society, Suwannee FL Cemeteries - Vol. 2, p. 32.

William B. Hurst

M
     He married Rebbecca Wells.1

Child of William B. Hurst and Rebbecca Wells

Citations

  1. [S69] IGI 1988 Florida USA, Marr. Entry by L. V. Cunningham, 8025602 Sh. 17, Film 1260764.

Rebbecca Wells

F
     She married William B. Hurst.1

Child of Rebbecca Wells and William B. Hurst

Citations

  1. [S69] IGI 1988 Florida USA, Marr. Entry by L. V. Cunningham, 8025602 Sh. 17, Film 1260764.

Jesse Taylor Hurst1

M, b. 17 October 1848, d. 28 October 1916
     Jesse was born on 17 October 1848. He was the son of William B. Hurst and Rebbecca Wells. He married Martha Ann Abigail Brannan, daughter of Robert H. Brannan and Mary Boatright, on 10 June 1870 at Live Oak, Suwannee, Florida, United States.1 Jesse died on 28 October 1916 at Suwannee, Florida, United States, at age 68.2 His body was buried on 29 October 1916 at Macedonia Cemetery, Suwannee, Florida, United States.

Children of Jesse Taylor Hurst and Martha Ann Abigail Brannan

Citations

  1. [S69] IGI 1988 Florida USA, Marr. Entry by L. V. Cunningham, 8025602 Sh. 17, Film 1260764.
  2. [S225] Suwannee County Genealogical Society, Suwannee FL Cemeteries - Vol. 2, p. 82.

Hugh Smithwick

M, b. 1620, d. before 1674
     Hugh was born in 1620 at England.1 He married Elizabeth (--?--), circa 1644.2 Hugh died before 1674 at Albemarle, North Carolina, British Colonial America.
     Hugh's occupation: Planter.
Biography of Hugh Smithwick:
Hugh Smithwick is the immigrant ancestor to America of this family. Three well written and documented genealogies have been written on this family. They are 1) Alice Duggan Gracy's genealogy "Thomas Hinds Duggan, Descendant and Ancestor"3 2) Coy J. Johnston in his book "Thomas Hooks, 1730-1803, His Antecedents and Descendants, and Allied Families of Harrison, Duggan and Smithwick"4 and 3) William Doub Bennett's "Smithwick Genealogy".5 All these authors have searched the extant primary records and cited them in their works. William Doub Bennets Bennetts "Smithwick Genealogy" in particular provides much more information and primary source documentation on Hugh Smithwick and his family in North Carolina than the other authors. The reader is advised to read those works forcomplete information on this family than what is provide below.

Hugh Smithwick "likely arrived in Virginia in early 1642, being one of fifteen men brought over by William Eyres, who received for their transportation into the Colony "750 Acs. Up. Norf. Co., May 23, 1642 ...Upon an arm of the W. br. of Nansemond River, adj. John Garrett." Upper Norfolk County became Nansemond County and is so known today; it borders north eastern North Carolina."6

Virginia planters in pursuit of rich land on which to grow tobacco began moving into the northeastern area of what is now North Carolina in the 1650's. By 1663 these early settlers had attracted attention in England. A group of English courtiers thought that they saw in the region an opportunity to colonize the country and thereby acquire power and wealth. They sought a grant from the King. King Charles II of England complied by issuing a charter to the eight Lords Proprietors in 1663 by which he created the Carolinas.

"Hugh Smithwick is reputed to be the first settler in the Edenton Bay, North Carolina Area, moving into North Carolina about 1659."7

"By 1669 Hugh Smithwick had acquired nearly 17,000 acres. That year he used himself , Elizabeth, his wife; Edward, Hugh, and Ralph, his sons; Elizabeth, his daughter; and Elizabeth Bembridge as headrights to obtain nearly four hundred acres of land."7

Hugh Smithwick died circa 1674, testate, but his will was lost. In that year, 1674, at a court held in Shaftesbury Precinct this order was entered: "Ordered that Mr. Hugh Smithwick's will be proved in Shaftesbury Precinct with all convenient speed..." 8

and,

"Att the Corte held for ye Precinct of Shaftesbury the first day of April 1680 Att Edward Smithwick house, present Mr. Thos. Cullen, Judge, Mr. Joseph Chew, Mr. Joseph Gilbert, Commissioners. It is ordered that Edward Smithwick have letters of administration upon the estate of his father Hugh Smithwick Decd." (Edward Smithwick having testified that the will had been lost.)8

Children of Hugh Smithwick and Elizabeth (--?--)

Citations

  1. [S208] Coy K. Johnston, Thomas Hooks, p. 115-122.
  2. [S591] William Doub Bennett, Bennett, Smithwick Genealogy, p.1.
  3. [S207] Alice Duggan Gracy, Gracy, Thomas Hinds Duggan, Mary Smithwick: Her Family pp. 151-167.
  4. [S208] Coy K. Johnston, Thomas Hooks, Smithwick Family of Eastern North Carolina, pp. 115-126.
  5. [S591] William Doub Bennett, Bennett, Smithwick Genealogy,.
  6. [S207] Alice Duggan Gracy, Gracy, Thomas Hinds Duggan, p. 151.
  7. [S591] William Doub Bennett, Bennett, Smithwick Genealogy, p. 1.
  8. [S208] Coy K. Johnston, Thomas Hooks, p. 122.

Elizabeth (--?--)

F, b. circa 1620, d. after 1694
     Elizabeth was born circa 1620. She married Hugh Smithwick, circa 1644.1 Elizabeth (--?--) married (--?--) Ward circa 1675 at Albemarle, North Carolina, British Colonial America.1 Elizabeth died after 1694 at Albemarle, North Carolina, British Colonial America.1

Children of Elizabeth (--?--) and Hugh Smithwick

Citations

  1. [S591] William Doub Bennett, Bennett, Smithwick Genealogy, p.1.

Edward Smithwick1

M, b. circa 1649, d. circa 1716
     Edward was born circa 1649 at Upper Norfolk, Virginia, British Colonial America.2 He was the son of Hugh Smithwick and Elizabeth (--?--). He married Elizabeth (--?--), circa 1672 at Chowan Precinct, Albemarle, North Carolina, British Colonial America.1 He married Africa (--?--), circa 1694 at Chowan Precinct, Albemarle, North Carolina, British Colonial America.2 He married Sarah (--?--), circa 1703 at Chowan Precinct, Albemarle, North Carolina, British Colonial America.1 Edward died circa 1716 at Edenton, Albemarle, North Carolina, British Colonial America.3
     Edward's occupation: Planter.
Biography of Edward Smithwick:
Edward Smithwick was a very prominent man of his time. Gracy4, Johnston5 and Bennett2 in theirgenealogies devote several pages to Edward. Bennett's discussion6 in particular is excellent.

"Edward was married three times but records indicating the maiden names of these wives have not been found. Africa is presumed by many researchers to be the mother of all of Edwards children."7

During the 1670's and 1680's when Edward was in his twenties and thirties, what government there was in the Carolina Colony and the Chowan Precinct area was either illegitimate, corrupt, being rebelled against or suffering under tyrannical rule. As a result there are few records during this period as most were destroyed. In fact, Edward spent considerable effort in the 1680's to 1700's filing claims with the courts to regain lands that were due him from his father's estate as well as reclaiming headrights and patents for his step-children, nephews and in-laws. For example Hugh Smithwick died in 1674 however, his will was not probated at that time. Possibly because John Jenkins whose commission as Acting Governor had expired in 1675 and Thomas Eastchurch who was elected Speaker, had Jenkins imprisoned because he continued to govern. By 1677, Eastchurch and cohort, Thomas Miller had gone to England where Eastchurch was appointed governor and Miller appointed Secretary. However, Eastchurch was delayed in returning and Miller illegally assumed the power of governor in July 1677 before Eastchurch returned. Miller's conduct of government contributed to "Culpeper's Rebellion" where Miller was imprisoned and John Culpeper and George Durant also illegally took over the government. Eastchurch died before he could return. It wasn't until July, 1679 until a commission arrived appointing John Harvey as Acting Governor that a government was re-established. Apparently many inhabitants let their legal business wait during this period until these issues were resolved. It was during the rebellion that colonists seized and destroyed government records and papers of officials.

It is not known what part, Edward Smithwick played in "Culpeper's Rebellion" of 1677-79. Culpeper's Rebellion was one of the first uprisings in the American Colonies. It was caused by enforcement of the navigation acts which forced the Carolina colonists to market their tobacco only thru New England shippers and the payment of heavy duties. The colonists wanted to ship directly to England or to other markets of their choosing. About 4000 settlers in the Albemarle Colony, through their leaders John Culpeper and George Durant rebelled. They took over the government, established courts, appointed judges and convened an assembly. Culpeper was governor for two years and then went to England to seek settlement of the matter. Culpeper was arrested in England, tried and acquitted. The matter ended without bloodshed.

In early 1780, Edward Smithwick came into court to probate his Father's will which had been lost or destroyed years earlier. On 1 April 1680 he received letters of administration of his fathers estate. It was not until 1683 that the estate was settled. However, here again land records were destroyed by Seth Sothel, one of the Lords Proprietors, who took over as governor from 1682 to 1689 when he was banished from the colony.

On 30 June 1680 Edward was arrested and imprisoned on charges trumped up by Robert Holden who had assumed control of the colony. On July 2, Holden himself was arrested and four days later, Edward was afforded bail and went home. However, on 12 September 1680, Edward was again arrested without warrant likely by Holden's direction and held in confinement for about 2 months until he was released because a grand jury could not return a true bill.


Edward increased his land holdings by inheritance, grant, purchase and transporting individuals into the Carolinas for which he received 50 acres for each. However, due to the lack of records no very clear account of his land ownership can be determined. By the time of his death he ultimately owned in excess of four thousand acres in the Cashie Neck area of present day Bertie County.

He was named surveyor in 1682, served as a juror and as a commissioner in local courts. He was a member of the House of Burgesses in 1703 and again in 1711 and 1712. In fact, he was likely a practising attorney as he was entitled to be referred to or addressed as Mr. Edward Smithwick or Edward Smithwick, Esquire.

He was present at the organization of St. Paul's Parish, Chowan Precinct in 1701. He served on its vestry for many years and gave the land for the first church building. This is the first church building in North Carolina. His name is inscribed on a marble plaque in the rear wall of the sanctuary of the present-day St. Paul's Episcopal Church in Edenton, North Carolina.

Edward signed his will on 21 January 1715 and it was proved in the 1716 October court.

Children of Edward Smithwick and Elizabeth (--?--)

Children of Edward Smithwick and Africa (--?--)

Citations

  1. [S207] Alice Duggan Gracy, Gracy, Thomas Hinds Duggan, p. 151-167.
  2. [S591] William Doub Bennett, Bennett, Smithwick Genealogy,.
  3. [S208] Coy K. Johnston, Thomas Hooks, p. 115-122.
  4. [S207] Alice Duggan Gracy, Gracy, Thomas Hinds Duggan,.
  5. [S208] Coy K. Johnston, Thomas Hooks,.
  6. [S591] William Doub Bennett, Bennett, Smithwick Genealogy, pp. 5-15.
  7. [S591] William Doub Bennett, Bennett, Smithwick Genealogy, p. 5.

Elizabeth (--?--)

F, b. circa 1650, d. circa 1690
     Elizabeth was born circa 1650. She married Edward Smithwick, son of Hugh Smithwick and Elizabeth (--?--), circa 1672 at Chowan Precinct, Albemarle, North Carolina, British Colonial America.1 Elizabeth died circa 1690 at Chowan Precinct, Albemarle, North Carolina, British Colonial America.
     Biography of Elizabeth (--?--):
Nothing is known about Elizabeth's maiden name.

Children of Elizabeth (--?--) and Edward Smithwick

Citations

  1. [S207] Alice Duggan Gracy, Gracy, Thomas Hinds Duggan, p. 151-167.

Edward Smithwick1

M, b. circa 1675, d. circa 1719
     Edward was born circa 1675 at Albemarle, North Carolina, British Colonial America. He was the son of Edward Smithwick and Elizabeth (--?--). He married Grace (--?--).2 Edward died circa 1719 at Edenton, Albemarle, North Carolina, British Colonial America.3
     Edward's occupation: Planter.

Citations

  1. [S207] Alice Duggan Gracy, Gracy, Thomas Hinds Duggan, p. 151-167.
  2. [S207] Alice Duggan Gracy, Gracy, Thomas Hinds Duggan,.
  3. [S208] Coy K. Johnston, Thomas Hooks, p. 115-122.

Sarah Speller1

F

Children of Sarah Speller and John Smithwick

Citations

  1. [S207] Alice Duggan Gracy, Gracy, Thomas Hinds Duggan, p. 151-167.

John Duggan

M, b. circa 1680, d. circa 1740
     John was born circa 1680. He married Alice (--?--).1 John died circa 1740 at Bertie, North Carolina, British Colonial America.
     John's occupation: Planter.
Biography of John Duggan:

      It is fairly certain that John
Duggan
(c.1680-c.1740) is the father of the John and William who appear in Bertie, Tyrell, and Martin County, North Carolina records between 1731 and 1763. It is known that John and William were brothers and a lawsuit against John
Duggan, Jr. in 1740 in Tyrell County [Betty Fagan
Burr - Abstracts - Tyrrell County North Carolina Minutes - Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions 1735thru 1754 Book 1. p. 88] suggests that this John Jr. was the son of John (c1680-c1740). This is supported further by the naming patterns of the children and their being in the same proximity. It is further, assumed that Thomas was also a brother based on proximity and naming patterns and all were the sons of John. The earliest record of a John
Duggan is dated 1662 in Northumberland District, Virginia where one Jno.
Duggan was brought over by Richard
Nelmes. This John could be the grandfather of John
Duggan (c.1780-c.1740), although there is no proof of this. Furthermore, it is possible that he was the "John
Duggin who, with his wife, Alice had their son Thomas baptized on 8 August 1714 in Christ Church, Middlesex County, Virginia is the John
Duggan (c.1680-c.1740). [Gracy -
Thomas Hinds Duggan p. 19]

      The earliest record of John Duggan in North Carolina is recorded in Chowan Precinct on 17 Jul 1719 when a John
Duggal sold Peter Gray a tract of land in Cashie Neck on the south side of Kesiah (Cashie) River in Chowan Precinct. [Johnston - Thomas Hooks p. 107] It is assumed that John was born circa 1680 and died circa 1740 based on the lawsuit of John, Jr. mentioned above.

Children of John Duggan and Alice (--?--)

Citations

  1. [S207] Alice Duggan Gracy, Gracy, Thomas Hinds Duggan,.

Henry Speller

M, d. 1728
     He married Patience (--?--).1 Henry died in 1728 at North Carolina, United States.

Child of Henry Speller and Patience (--?--)

Citations

  1. [S208] Coy K. Johnston, Thomas Hooks, p. 115-116.

Patience (--?--)

F, d. circa 1738
     She married Henry Speller.1 Patience died circa 1738 at North Carolina, United States.

Child of Patience (--?--) and Henry Speller

Citations

  1. [S208] Coy K. Johnston, Thomas Hooks, p. 115-116.

Thomas Speller1

M
     Thomas Speller was the son of Henry Speller and Patience (--?--). He married Patience (--?--). Thomas died at North Carolina, United States.

Child of Thomas Speller and Patience (--?--)

Citations

  1. [S208] Coy K. Johnston, Thomas Hooks, p. 115-116.

Hugh Smithwick1

M, b. circa 1650, d. before 1693
     Hugh was born circa 1650 at Nansemond, Virginia, British Colonial America. He was the son of Hugh Smithwick and Elizabeth (--?--). Hugh died before 1693 at Chowan Precinct, Albemarle, North Carolina, British Colonial America.2
     Hugh's occupation: Planter.

Citations

  1. [S207] Alice Duggan Gracy, Gracy, Thomas Hinds Duggan, p. 151-167.
  2. [S208] Coy K. Johnston, Thomas Hooks, p. 115-122.

Ralph Smithwick1

M, b. circa 1655, d. before 1693
     Ralph was born circa 1655 at Nansemond, Virginia, British Colonial America. He was the son of Hugh Smithwick and Elizabeth (--?--). Ralph died before 1693 at Chowan Precinct, Albemarle, North Carolina, British Colonial America.2
     Ralph's occupation: Planter.

Citations

  1. [S207] Alice Duggan Gracy, Gracy, Thomas Hinds Duggan, p. 151-167.
  2. [S208] Coy K. Johnston, Thomas Hooks, p. 115-122.

Elizabeth Smithwick1

F, b. circa 1660, d. circa 1692

Citations

  1. [S207] Alice Duggan Gracy, Gracy, Thomas Hinds Duggan, p. 151-167.
  2. [S591] William Doub Bennett, Bennett, Smithwick Genealogy,.

John Smithwick1

M, b. circa 1670, d. December 1696
     John was born circa 1670 at Albemarle, North Carolina, British Colonial America. He was the son of Hugh Smithwick and Elizabeth (--?--). He married Hannah Kent, daughter of Thomas Kent and Ann (--?--), circa 1690 at Chowan Precinct, Albemarle, North Carolina, British Colonial America. John died in December 1696 at Chowan Precinct, Albemarle, North Carolina, British Colonial America. John died in present day Hyde Co., North Carolina..2
     John's occupation: Planter.

Citations

  1. [S207] Alice Duggan Gracy, Gracy, Thomas Hinds Duggan, p. 151-167.
  2. [S591] William Doub Bennett, Bennett, Smithwick Genealogy,.

Hannah Kent1

F, b. 10 May 1673, d. November 1711

Citations

  1. [S207] Alice Duggan Gracy, Gracy, Thomas Hinds Duggan, p. 151-167.

Thomas Kent

M
     He married Ann (--?--).1

Child of Thomas Kent and Ann (--?--)

Citations

  1. [S207] Alice Duggan Gracy, Gracy, Thomas Hinds Duggan,.

Ann (--?--)

F
     She married Thomas Kent.1

Child of Ann (--?--) and Thomas Kent

Citations

  1. [S207] Alice Duggan Gracy, Gracy, Thomas Hinds Duggan,.

John Smithwick

M, b. circa 1677, d. 1762
     John was born circa 1677 at Albemarle, North Carolina, British Colonial America. He was the son of Edward Smithwick and Elizabeth (--?--). He married Sarah Speller, daughter of Thomas Speller and Patience (--?--), circa 1710 at Chowan Precinct, Albemarle, North Carolina, British Colonial America. John died in 1762 at Bertie, North Carolina, British Colonial America.1
     John's occupation: Planter.
Biography of John Smithwick:
John Smithwick first appears in early records on Chowan Precinct.

On 29 December 1712 and again on 1 January 1712/13 John Smithwick signed receipts "They received of Edward Moseley thirty bushels of Indian Corn by order Maj. Gale for the Public Service." 2

In November 1713, John Smithwick acquired 440 acres of land in what was to become Bertie Precinct in present day Bertie County, North Carolina. He petitioned the court in Chowan for land that was granted to his father but had lapsed. The following was recorded. "Upon petition of Jno. Smithwick showing that a track of land on Kesiah (Cashie) River conveying 440 acres was formerly granted to Edwd. Smithwick by Patent and is Lapsed for want of Seating and prays the same be granted to him. Ordered that ye same Land be granted to ye said J[ohn Smithwick as prey'd."2

On July 1, 1715 Edward Smithwick made a Deed of Gift to his son John Smithwick "800 acres on north side of Morattock (Roanoke) River." All this land is in the Cashie Neck portion of present day Bertie County between the Cashie River on the north and the Roanoke River on the south. 2

John Smithwick apparently lived the rest of his lifetime in the Cashie Neck portion of present day Bertie County. In 1722, this area became Bertie Precinct being formed out of Chowan Precinct.

On 23 February 1723/24 John Smithwick deeded to John Johnson
"365 Acres on Shojotack (Moratock/Roanoke) adj. James Williamson. Patent date June 25, 1723". This deed was witnessed by James Williamson And Edmund Smithwick and recorded in the November 1724 Bertie Precinct Court. Henry Speller by virtue of Power of atty from John Smithwick acknowledged the deed in open court. [Bertie County NC Deed Book A:315]

On 7 Nov 1724 Edmund Smithwick deeded to John Smithwick 250 Acres on Smithwick Creek for 50 pounds. Witnesses were Nathaniel Ming and William Lattemore. [Bertie County NC Deed Book A:309] This is the first evidence of John owning land on the South Side of the Roanoke River in present day Martin County. As the name Smithwick Creek was used in this deed, it is apparent that the Smithwicks had lived in the Smithwick Creek area for some years prior to 1724. In 1725, Edmund sold an additional 200 acres on the south side of Moratock (Roanoke) River and on the lower side of Smithwick Creek. Smithwick Creek as an area to the south of the present day Town of Williamston, North Carolina. The main street in Williamston is named Smithwick Street.

On 7 August 1741 in Bertie Precinct, NC John Smithwick gift deeded "125 Acres for love and affection... unto my well beloved daughter Mary Duggan wife of William Duggan... to Mary and her lawfully begotten heirs forever... to William Duggan for the term of life... Land between Moratack River and Charlton's Creek. "...if Mary have no issue to return to the Lawful heirs of John Smithwick" The deed of this land is assumed to be a wedding gift to his daughter Mary. [Bertie County Deed Book F:267]

John Smithwick died in early 1762 based on his will being probated in Bertie County on that date. His will listed all his children.
John Smithwick first appears in early records on Chowan Precinct.

On 29 December 1712 and again on 1 January 1712/13 John Smithwick signed receipts "They received of Edward Moseley thirty bushels of Indian Corn by order Maj. Gale for the Public Service." 2

In November 1713, John Smithwick acquired 440 acres of land in what was to become Bertie Precinct in present day Bertie County, North Carolina. He petitioned the court in Chowan for land that was granted to his father but had lapsed. The following was recorded. "Upon petition of Jno. Smithwick showing that a track of land on Kesiah (Cashie) River conveying 440 acres was formerly granted to Edwd. Smithwick by Patent and is Lapsed for want of Seating and prays the same be granted to him. Ordered that ye same Land be granted to ye said J[ohn Smithwick as prey'd."2

On July 1, 1715 Edward Smithwick made a Deed of Gift to his son John Smithwick "800 acres on north side of Morattock (Roanoke) River." All this land is in the Cashie Neck portion of present day Bertie County between the Cashie River on the north and the Roanoke River on the south. 2

John Smithwick apparently lived the rest of his lifetime in the Cashie Neck portion of present day Bertie County. In 1722, this area became Bertie Precinct being formed out of Chowan Precinct.

On 23 February 1723/24 John Smithwick deeded to John Johnson
"365 Acres on Shojotack (Moratock/Roanoke) adj. James Williamson. Patent date June 25, 1723". This deed was witnessed by James Williamson And Edmund Smithwick and recorded in the November 1724 Bertie Precinct Court. Henry Speller by virtue of Power of atty from John Smithwick acknowledged the deed in open court. [Bertie County NC Deed Book A:315]

On 7 Nov 1724 Edmund Smithwick deeded to John Smithwick 250 Acres on Smithwick Creek for 50 pounds. Witnesses were Nathaniel Ming and William Lattemore. [Bertie County NC Deed Book A:309] This is the first evidence of John owning land on the South Side of the Roanoke River in present day Martin County. As the name Smithwick Creek was used in this deed, it is apparent that the Smithwicks had lived in the Smithwick Creek area for some years prior to 1724. In 1725, Edmund sold an additional 200 acres on the south side of Moratock (Roanoke) River and on the lower side of Smithwick Creek. Smithwick Creek as an area to the south of the present day Town of Williamston, North Carolina. The main street in Williamston is named Smithwick Street.

On 7 August 1741 in Bertie Precinct, NC John Smithwick gift deeded "125 Acres for love and affection... unto my well beloved daughter Mary Duggan wife of William Duggan... to Mary and her lawfully begotten heirs forever... to William Duggan for the term of life... Land between Moratack River and Charlton's Creek. "...if Mary have no issue to return to the Lawful heirs of John Smithwick" The deed of this land is assumed to be a wedding gift to his daughter Mary. [Bertie County Deed Book F:267]

John Smithwick died in early 1762 based on his will being probated in Bertie County on that date. His will listed all his children.

Children of John Smithwick

Children of John Smithwick and Sarah Speller

Citations

  1. [S591] William Doub Bennett, Bennett, Smithwick Genealogy,.
  2. [S207] Alice Duggan Gracy, Gracy, Thomas Hinds Duggan, p. 162.

Elizabeth Smithwick1

F, b. circa 1682, d. 1692

Citations

  1. [S207] Alice Duggan Gracy, Gracy, Thomas Hinds Duggan, p. 151-167.
  2. [S591] William Doub Bennett, Bennett, Smithwick Genealogy, p. 15.

Sarah Smithwick1

F, b. circa 1700
     Sarah was born circa 1700 at Chowan, North Carolina, British Colonial America.2 She was the daughter of Edward Smithwick and Africa (--?--).

Citations

  1. [S207] Alice Duggan Gracy, Gracy, Thomas Hinds Duggan, p. 151-167.
  2. [S591] William Doub Bennett, Bennett, Smithwick Genealogy, p. 27.